Energy and Environment

The Energy and Environmental Policy Program strives to continue Senator Baker’s work in the areas of energy and environmental policy. Among the issues addressed are energy consumption and conservation; nuclear energy; renewable energy; air and water pollution; and climate change. The center hopes to study the interaction of energy and the environment to develop economically sound policies that improve the quality of life of the world’s citizens. The Energy and Environmental Policy program is led by Dr. Charles Sims. Since 2012, our Baker Energy and Environmental Forum, with support from TNSCORE and TVA, has provided a forum for the academic community to share their research findings from a broad set of national and international academic departments, researchers, and students with a common interest in environmental and energy issues. An interdisciplinary committee of UT faculty invites four to six speakers each semester from fields such as ecology, economics, urban planning, law, atmospheric chemistry and sociology to present on occasional Thursdays at 3:30 pm in the Baker Center’s Toyota Auditorium. The committee members are:
  • Paul Armsworth, Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
  • Jake LaRiviere, Economics
  • Becky Jacobs, College of Law
  • Chris Clark, Agricultural Economics
Partnerships with Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars, TNSCORE, and the Tennessee Valley Authority, are examples of ways our Fellows work with professionals in the field to develop educational programs and research that inform the public, policymakers, and the world.

Energy and Environment Policy Area Media

Publications

Transitioning to Electric Vehicles

brief-paper

David L. Greene, Sangsoo Park, and Changzheng Liu discuss the logistics and implications of utilizing electric cars and the effects of technological and market uncertainties on the likelihood of a successful transition and its benefits and costs.



Analyzing the Transition to Electric Drive in California

brief-paper

This report describes an effort to model the transition to electric drive vehicles in California, including measuring the costs and benefits, quantifying the transition barriers and network external benefits, and estimating the effects of public policies on the transition process.




Webcasts